Sunday, May 16, 2010

New Items, Bat Conservation Groups

Well, the connection seems fine now and I'm hoping to get over to Facebook tomorrow. Hi whoever may happen to see this - I hope everyone's doing well! I've been pretty lax on the online stuff these last few days, but I'm trying to remedy that. I got sick of being constantly frustrated with the connection, then I got myself into a bit of a creating frenzy [as far as that goes with me].

I was going to put this last, but it's way too cute to wait - this is one of Tolga Bat Hospital's resident Spectacled Flying Foxes, Sushi, with her pup. I write more about Tolga below. :)



I've finally finished up the PMC snakeskin pendants I started making almost a month ago, and Lewis the Megachiroptera is almost complete. I'm considering using him for a finished piece, but also listing him as a custom order pendant. I may do the same with Chauncey and Woodrow. The snakeskin pics will take you to my listings if you're interested, and the other is just to show what the flying fox looks like now that it's been oxidized. I burnished all the raised areas, so it's actually shinier than it looks in this picture.

Eris Pendant


Eris 2 Pendant


Lewis


I thought this would be a perfect time to point out some of the great organizations working for the protection and conservation of bats. I've written a little summary for each, but if you love bats like I do, I highly recommend visiting the sites so you can learn more about their work.

Bat Conservation International is working to understand and eliminate White-nose Syndrome, as well as restore bat populations which have been decimated by it. They also work directly with governmental, industrial and private agencies to help ensure safe management and protection of common bat roosting sites such as bridges, mines and caves. They offer education and volunteer opportunities to the general public, as well as scholarships and grants to students, scientists and various grassroots conservation efforts. My Nana's second husband was a BCI member and made me aware of the organization, and because of him and their widespread involvement in bat conservation, this is where 10% of the earnings from my shop goes.

Bat World Sanctuary rescues and gives lifetime sanctuary to non-releasable bats that have been orphaned, injured, confiscated from the illegal pet trade, and retired from zoos and research facilities. They have 20 rescue centers nationwide and provide information on how to provide temporary care until you can locate a local rescue center. They also offer education and rehabilitation training programs to the general public.

Lubee Bat Conservancy is an international organization dedicated to protecting fruit bats and their habitats through research, conservation and education. They offer educational and volunteer opportunities to the public, and run a research and conservation breeding center in Florida which provides training to scientists and students.

Tolga Bat Hospital in Australia rescues, rehabilitates and releases bats, and provides lifetime sanctuary to those that are non-releasable or have been retired from zoos. They work to educate the public and provide information about the risks and problems specific to bats in Australia, including all four species of Australian flying foxes. The hospital also provides volunteer opportunities, works to restore local bat habitats and facilitates research into flying foxes.

Not sure if this is also Sushi, but it's another pic from Tolga.


I hope everyone has a great night!

8 comments:

Naomi said...

We once rescued a Serotine bat that had hit a neighbours window (there must have been an underlying problem for that to happen in the first place!). Here in the UK all bats are protected. It's illegal for just anyone to take them in for rehabilitation, so I took my little parcel to a friend who is registered to take them in.
Once he was better, I was allowed to release him back in the area that he originally came from. It was wonderful!! We even have pictures of the release. The Seratine is one of the UK's largest bat species measuring between 58mm - 80mm from head to toe, with a wing span of 320mm - 380mm. A huge size difference to Sushi and her pup.
Keep up the great work Kim!
By the way, I LOVE Erin's skin shed pendant....

Naomi said...

Hanging my head in sham!!! I meant Eris' skin shed pendant... Sorry :o)

kwkmjk said...

Love the post on the bats..great information.

Love the pendant !

Walkies soon for us...beautiful day, so I am sure we will see some great flora and fauna.

Faerie Moon Creations said...

Thank you so much for posting this information! It saddens me that this is happening, and that no one has yet to have been able to prevent it. Theresa

Julia said...

Thanks for sharing all the great info and such lovely photos.

compost said...

Beautiful work!!! Thanks for the info.

Mortira said...

My Batman-obsessed little boy is going crazy for those photos!

I featured your wonderful blog on Inspirational Beading today!
http://inspirationalbeading.blogspot.com/2010/05/blog-spotlight-ksk-designs.html

Kim said...

Naomi - what a wonderful story & how cool that you got to release him! Poor little guy, sounds like something was definitely off to begin with. I had never heard of that bat, but I looked him up - so cute w/ those big ears! I'd love to become a licensed rehabilitator, but it's very hard to catch a local program. I'd also love to see your pics! Thank you so much about the Eris pendants. I really hope you're doing well & that I can catch up w/ you a bit later today!

Maman - thank you, your support means so much & I think it's pretty awesome that my mom reads my blog. Everything's fine here, but I'm missing our walks! Those first baby geese at Betar are getting huge!

Theresa - thank you so much for your comment! It's a very sad situation, but it's nice to know there are a lot of people working hard to find a resolution. I hope to participate in a local survey this year, which would involve mounting a listening device on top of the car & driving around in our less populated areas. Apparently experts can identify species by their echolocation calls, as well as general signs of distress. Not a bad way to lend a little hand.

Julia - I'm so glad you enjoyed the pics! I hope the info is helpful, I know you love bats too. Thanks so much for your comment!

Jess - it's nice to see you here & thank you for your kind compliment!

Mortira - aw, I'm glad your little boy loved the pics! And what a wonderful surprise after being away from here for so long! You have such a lovely blog, I'm truly honored that you would feature mine. On my way over to check it out, but you've already made my day & also inspired me to get back to taking care of my blog. Thank you so much!

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